Monday, May 2:
Sister Pat Boyle, CSJ on Stewardship and Discipleship in the Early Church.

Tuesday, May 3:
Chris Donoghue from the Archdiocese of Boston about Stewardship and Discipleship.

In early May, St. Matthew the Evangelist parish, at St. Andrew Church in North Billerica, hosted Chris Donoghue from the Archdiocese of Boston. He spoke about Stewardship and Discipleship.
This video is raw footage of a portion of his talk.

Stewardship… a Journey (Easter)

So just what does stewardship have to do with Easter? Actually, quite a lot. St. Peter reminds us today that Jesus Christ “… commissioned us to preach to the people and testify that he is the one appointed by God”. Who are the people you might speak openly to about your relationship with Christ. Pray for the courage to be like Peter and Mary Magdalen and tell your story – the story of how God has worked and continues to work in your life. This is not just good news; it is The Good News of Jesus Christ. Share it!

Jesus preached about being a good steward, and the Bible interprets stewardship as giving back to God the fruits of our labors, about caring for the possessions that God has entrusted to us. First let’s look at the word, steward. The word, steward, translates in Greek as (pronounced “oikonomon”). This word most closely correlates in English to manager. As we are familiar with – a manager is someone who is given the responsibility to take care of something on behalf of someone else. This role is that of a “middle man”.

The core of stewardship is gratitude – a gratitude that overflows into giving as a way of thankfulness for all that God has given us. Let us be grateful for God’s presence in our struggle to overcome any anxieties, let us be agents of hope for those who continue to suffer, let us be grateful for all those who cared for us. Let us pray in gratitude for our parish community.

Everything we have is a gift from God and we are asked to return a portion of those gifts in gratitude for all we have. And what is a steward? Being grateful for all the gifts we have received and being eager to use them to show our love for God and for one another. Stewardship is a way of life – and looking at everything good as a gift from God. Stewardship is about giving back, paying it forward, a way of life based in faith and belief.

Stewardship… a Journey (Holy Week)

So just what does stewardship have to do with Holy Week and the story of the Passion? Actually, quite a lot! Holy Week provides an excellent chunk of time to be intentional about the stewardship of time, resources, and relationship. It reminds us that even though we often desire easy short-cuts and quick answers, sometimes we need to be deliberate about how we spend our hours, days, and limited resources.

Jesus preached about being a good steward, and the Bible interprets stewardship as giving back to God the fruits of our labors, about caring for the possessions that God has entrusted to us. First let’s look at the word, steward. The word, steward, translates in Greek as (pronounced “oikonomon”). This word most closely correlates in English to manager. As we are familiar with – a manager is someone who is given the responsibility to take care of something on behalf of some- one else. This role is that of a “middle man”.

Everything we have is a gift from God and we are asked to return a portion of those gifts in gratitude for all we have. The core of stewardship is gratitude – a gratitude that overflows into giving as a way of thankfulness for all that God has given us. And what is a steward? Being grateful for all the gifts we have received and being eager to use them to show our love for God and for one an- other. Stewardship is a way of life – and looking at everything good as a gift from God. Steward- ship is about giving back, paying it forward, a way of life based in faith and belief.

The primary rewards of stewardship are always personal – both with God and our neighbors. Part of stewardship is continuing to broaden our knowledge of God and His church. As members of the church, we are called to continue the work of Jesus’ and His mission – the mission of the Church.

Stewardship and Lent

Lent is a “springtime of the soul.” It is good time to clear out that which clutters our lives to make room for what nourishes our souls. It is a time to feast on the word of God, to review each day’s activities noticing where God’s grace was evident. Lent give us forty days to nurture new growth and to reclaim the essentials of our faith life. Whenever we try to be faithful at clearing space for God, temptations will no doubt follow. Jesus reassures us that by relying on the Spirit and frequenting the sacraments, our Lent will bring about a real “springtime” of the soul.

During this Lenten season, we will be asked to respond in many different ways. There will be fasting, almsgiving, and abstinence from certain foods. There will be invitations to various devotions and we will be asked to reflect on our faith.

It will take too long. I don’t know anybody. I am just too busy. How many things can we think of as reasons why we should say no to the call of Jesus Christ? Wait. We didn’t know to whom those responses were directed? We say no to many things and many people, but we wouldn’t say no to Jesus. Really?

Use this time of Lent to talk to God, and to listen to him. Almsgiving extends our love for God – so we see Him in our neighbor, we see Him in those who need love and compassion. It is through almsgiving that we recognize the sacrifice that Jesus made on the cross.

Stewardship – The Journey Continues

The beatitudes. The text can be so familiar, it is easy for our thoughts to drift off and miss the invitation we are given. These beatitudes are a portrait of how Jesus lived. Now he is speaking directly to his disciples – to us – describing the mindset by which we are to live. They turn the standards of our world upside down and challenge us to gospel living. Choose one beatitude to pray about and ask for the grace to grow in that beatitude attitude!

Think of the Beatitudes as Jesus’ mission statement. These are gifts from God that lead us to a life filled with integrity and honesty. Think of those around us, your neighbor for example. Appreciating and being thoughtful towards your neighbor is an important aspect of stewardship.

To be a steward of a neighbor implies getting to know others, to seek understanding and common ground. It means praying for the welfare of those one does not know and bridging the gap by finding ways to enter into a relationship and learn from each other. It means seeing the image of God in everyone, and it means stepping out of our comfort zone.

Stewardship – Discover Your Gifts

In speaking to the prophet Jeremiah, God reminds him “before you were born, I dedicated you, a prophet to the nations, I appointed you.” Whether a prophet or a disciple, the message is the same – God’s love never fails and we are to mirror that love in our lives. St. Paul describes what that love looks like in our lives. It is patient, kind, not jealous, not rude, does not hold grudges, is hopeful and truthful. To be loving as St. Paul describes is a tall order, and yet there is no doubt that this is our task as Disciples of Christ.

As disciples and stewards we live each day in gratitude for all the blessings that God has given to us. We do not own the gifts God gives to us, but are only here on earth to use those gifts to do His work. It is our responsibility to show our gratitude to God for these gifts, by giving back to Him and by being truly grateful to share them. One very important way we can share and give back to God is by spending some time in prayer. Whether you spend some quiet moments talking to God or to just be with Jesus, or attend Mass and pray. He hears you!

By working together to grow as one faith community we will become stronger and more vibrant. As stewards, our community will thrive, as we share our gifts with the parish, and be examples for future generations.

Stewardship… We Continue Our Journey

“Do whatever he tells you.” These are the words of Mary at the end of today’s gospel! Mary is saying these words to all of us. What is Jesus telling you to do? The psalm gives us one idea – “proclaim God’s mar- velous deeds”. St. Paul also reminds us that all of us have special gifts, that are different if each of us. Take a moment this week to pray, to thank God for the unique gifts He has given to you. Then, take it a step further. Like Mary, do whatever Jesus tells you to do – using those gifts to serve others.

We often find ourselves so busy living our lives that often times we miss the little, important things. Those acts of kindness. Everything we have and all that we are comes from God. Because of this, we are called to be stewards using those unique special gifts that He has given to each of us. What Jesus wishes for most from you is you! “It is more blessed to give than to receive.” Acts 20:35

Let’s share our unique gifts to serve the Lord 365 days a year! Take a moment this week to pray, thank God for your unique gifts, and use those gifts to share with others. That is what stewardship is all about.

What is Stewardship?

Jesus preached about being a good steward, and the Bible interprets stewardship as giving back to God the fruits of our labors, about caring for the possessions that God has entrusted to us.

First let’s look at the word, steward. The word, steward, translates in Greek as οἰκονόμον (pronounced “oikonomon”). This word most closely correlates in English to manager. As we are familiar with – a manager is someone who is given the responsibility to take care of something on behalf of someone else. This role is that of a “middle man”.

Everything we have is a gift from God and we are asked to return a portion of those gifts in gratitude for all we have. Stewardship is about how we care for the possessions that God has entrusted to us. Stewardship calls us to nurture our relationships with God, our families, our church, our workplace, our environment, our suffering neighbors, and our world. Stewardship is also a personal response to the Gospel call to conversion of mind and heart. Stewardship is a faith response to share all we have and thus participate fully in God’s plan for our world.

God is the source of all we have and are, and we can learn to see ourselves as caring in the work of God by the way we live, by the way we use our time, talents and financial resources. Stewardship is also a personal response to the Gospel call to conversion of mind and heart. Stewardship is a faith response to share all we have and thus participate fully in God’s plan for our world. How can we share? We can share spiritually (by attending Mass, praying regularly, attending parish faith group), sharing our talents (volunteering in multiple ways in the parish), and sharing our treasure (by contributing to the parish through giving).

Stewardship is a way of life. The primary rewards of stewardship are always personal – both with God and our neighbors. Going forward we will continue to explore the path of stewardship here at St. Matthew Parish each week. Part of stewardship is continuing to broaden our knowledge of God and His church.

“As each one has received a gift, use it to serve one another as good stewards of God’s varied grace” (1 Peter 4:10)

Stewardship… A Journey (Holy Week)
Stewardship and Lent
Stewardship – the Journey Continues
Stewardship – Discover Your Gifts
Stewardship – Continue the Journey
What is Stewardship?

The Generosity Habit – Dynamic Catholic (from Lent 2022):